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Black Reed Bay by Rod Reynolds – a review BLOG TOUR

Rod Reynolds is fast becoming a favourite author of mine and therefore I was delighted to be able to join the blog tour for his latest Black Reed Bay.

Black Reed Bay starts with a panicked phone call to the police from a woman who is running away from an upmarket gated community and believes her life is in danger. The call gets disconnected before the police can find out any more information. Detective Casey Wray is sent to investigate when it seems that the young woman has disappeared without a trace. At first she thinks it is just a simple domestic dispute gone wrong, until more bodies appear and more secrets are uncovered.

This was an interesting story that I very much enjoyed. What I really liked was the pace of the novel, the only way I can think to describe it is an ebb and flow of a novel. Everytime I felt like it was slowing down and I was going to take a break something shocking was thrown in and I had to keep reading. This is a really atmospheric book and the contrast between the perceived privedged background of a rich gated community and the dark misery of the criminal world gives it an extra depth.

The character of Casey was interesting, there was enough of a back story given to make her seem real, yet there was a sense that there were hidden depths not explored in this story. She works hard and clearly cares about her cases but not to the detriment of everything else.

There was lots going on within Black Reed Bay and at one point it’s difficult to see how on earth things are all going to be tied up. However Rod Reynolds manages to wrap all of them up neatly in a satisfying end. Overall a great story.

To find out what others though of Black Reed Bay visit the other stops on the tour.

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Deep Cover by Leigh Russell – a review BLOG TOUR

I was pleased to be invited onto the blog tour for Leigh Russell’s new novel Deep Cover, book 16 in the Geraldine Steel series.

In Deep Cover Geraldine is still in York, whilst her partner Ian both in work and life has gone to London for a special assignment. When the body of a sex worker turns up Geraldine tries to put her turbulent personal life and worries about her ‘missing’ colleague behind her to track down the killer. However the trail soon goes cold and Geraldine and her new colleague Matthew are stuck hunting dead ends until the arrival of a second body. Meanwhile in London Ian has gone undercover to try and track down a group of drug dealers, but this is a personal quest too as the group are threatening Geraldine and Ian is determined to help her and her sister.

I enjoyed this novel, which was definitely a tale of two halves switching as it did between York and London. I must admit I preferred the York based story rather than the London one, but then I live in York so am probably a bit biased. I enjoyed the relationship between Geraldine and the new character Matthew and felt they bounced off each other well.

The narratives from Ian and Geraldine were interspersed with chapters told from Thomas’ point of view as the killer which I did enjoy. I felt these gave an interesting element to the story as you sensed how he was spiralling out of control. This is a fast paced novel and I found myself staying up late to finish ‘just one more chapter’

Deep Cover is the 16th novel to feature Geraldine and I think it would be difficult to read as a standalone as there is a lot of back story to cover, but also you are in for a treat if you have not yet read any of the Steel series so I’d definitely recommend starting at the beginning.

Find out what others thought of Deep Cover at the other stops on the blog tour.

You can buy Deep Cover here from No Exit Press

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Girls Who Lie by Eva Björg Ægisdottir – a review BLOG TOUR

When I received the email about this, the premise of sounded so good that despite it being the second in a series I jumped at the chance to be able to join the blog tour for Girls Who Lie by Eva Björg Ægisdottir.

Girls Who Lie focusses on the disappearance of single mother Marianna. It is assumed that she has committed suicide until her body is discovered and it’s clearly murder. Her daughter Hekla is in foster care but seems to be coping well at least to start with. Police Officer Elma and her colleagues take on the case of Marianna and soon get drawn into what becomes an increasingly complex case. Meanwhile 15 years previously another single mother is struggling to bond with her new born child and to make a new life for herself.

Girls Who Lie was an excellent read that captivated me from the start. The story flits between the two timelines with ease as we uncover the truth about what happened to Marianne and Hekla, as well as the strange lonely girl in the past. The historical element first person chapters were especially chilling and created a interesting dimension to the police procedural element of the main story.

I enjoyed finding out about the main character Elma, and about her relationship with her own family which becomes more fraught as she puts her desire to find out the truth ahead of everything else. Like all good detectives Elma has a complicated background but I didn’t find this over powered the mystery which was still the main focus of the story.

The writing in this novel can only be described as beautiful, obviously it is translated but perfectly so. The descriptions of Iceland and the town this is set in are really intriguing and I found myself googling lots of places such as lava fields as I read on.

The story itself was compelling and it was littered with misdirection and red herrings that made it a complete page turner. I thoroughly enjoyed this book, it’s an excellent addition to my Nordic Noir collection and I have already ordered her first The Creak on the Stairs so I can catch up with Elma from the beginning.

To find out what others thought of Girls Who Lie you can visit the other stops on the blog tour:

Click here to buy your own copy of Girls Who Lie

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The Web They Wove by Catherine Yaffe – a review BLOG TOUR

The Web They Wove by Catherine Yaffee begins when the mutilated body of a young female is found at a park in Leeds. DI Ziggy Thornes and his team are called out to investigate. With little evidence found at the scene it seems like they are stuck at a dead end. When a second body turns up in the same place, Ziggy starts to feel the pressure as the inevitable comparisons with the Yorkshire Ripper start in the press. When he realises that the victims have been held captive for days before being murdered, he starts to realise that there is a seriously depraved person out there, and that the case is starting to turn personal.

Although this is the second novel by Catherine Yaffe it is the first I have read. However this can absolutely be read as a standalone. The back ground of Ziggy is revealed gradually through the story, including why he’s called Ziggy, and so I didn’t get the feeling I was missing anything. Although he was the typical divorced detective he also had a vulnerability about him that I liked and made him seem more rounded. His interaction with his team members was natural and he genuinely seemed to care about his team.

I am a big fan of novels that give the perspective from the serial killer and this is no exception. I thought the chapter’s from the killers voice gave an interesting extra dimension to the story, that I found fascinating. They were interspered thoughout and gave a change from the hectic pace of the police procedures.

The story was full of twists and turns that really drew me in from the beginning with some well written prose. Every time I thought I had a handle on where the case was going I would be thrown off direction once again. I very much enjoyed The Web they Wove and will definitely be looking to catch up with Ziggy on his next case.

To find out what others thought of Catherine Yaffe’s novel visit the other stops on the tour:

UK – https://www.amazon.co.uk/Web-They-Wove-Tangled-Book-ebook/dp/B0937K58PF/

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